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7 Tips For More Fun Walks With Your Dog!

Ohio Greyhound in sweater

January is National Walk Your Pet Month! Walks can have many different purposes including human exercise, pet exercise and pet entertainment. Sometimes humans try to satisfy all purposes with one walk, but that often leads to frustration for all. Here are a few ideas to help everyone enjoy their walks more:

  • If your dog is a sighthound, human exercise probably isn’t that much fun for him. Human speed and endurance standards are completely different. Consider getting your exercise separately.
  • Dress your pup appropriately for the weather. Generally, if you feel cold enough to want a jacket, your greyhound probably does too. And be sure to keep your dog safe from frostbite. Dogs’ ears, tail and paws are the most vulnerable and need protection any time the temperature drops below 32 degrees.
  • Schedule some walk time exclusively to satisfy your dog’s olfactory pleasure center by sniffing. Dogs gather important information through smell and feel a legitimate need to explore with their noses. Humans tend to enjoy this part of the walk more if they set a time goal, such as a half hour, rather than a distance goal. The point of this part of the walk is sniffing, not distance or fitness.
  • Walk with a friend so you have someone to talk to, listen to books on tape, or enjoy your

    favorite music to help pass the time.

  • Invite a friend for your dog along too. Greyhounds are especially fond of their own kind and seem to derive a special enjoyment from the companionship of another grey. If you have other greys in your area, consider setting up a regular date. You’ll likely get a lot of attention and help spread the word about greyhound adoption too.
  • Take a different path once in a while. It doesn’t have to be far from home. Just go a block up or start the other direction for a change of scenery.
  • Track your progress with a walking app that helps earn money for your favorite nonprofit, hopefully OGGA.  WoofTrax, Walk for a Dog, and ResQWalk are both free.

Keep in mind that your pups are home all day, often alone, and that a short walk might be the most fun they will have. They get so excited because they look forward to it that much. Walks also break up the monotony, stimulate your pup, use up excess energy and help with numerous behavioral problems such as separation anxiety. So please start a healthy dog walking habit this year!

Reprinted with Permission from GALT.

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greyhound 2 april adopt month

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April Greyhound Adoption Jennifer Dantzler 2015

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Bart Simpson April Greyhound Adoption month

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Today is NATIONAL DOG DAY

Jed and Krak at work

Jed (adoptable) & Krak enjoy going to work with mom, Wendy, at Viking Community Animal Hospital on occasion.  However, they have a request on National Dog Day….

“We would like to EACH have a BED to lay on.  We are kinda big guys for just one small bed, don’t you think”??????

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Preparing to take blood samples of Wheeling greyhounds after a race are from left, Dawn Hudson, Kelly Kontur and Dr. C. Guillermo Couto of The Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine Greyhound Health and Wellness Program. (Photos by Stan Pawloski, Times Leader Wire Editor)

 

Last year the Wheeling Island Racetrack and The Ohio State University  formed a joint venture targeting the wellness of greyhounds.

With support of the West Virginia Racing Commission and Wheeling Island, the investigative study was conducted in July (2011) at Wheeling by Dr. Couto, Dr. Bohenko and a group of veterinarians and students from Ohio State University.

 

Dr. Bohenko said the study had three goals –
provide health screens for 120 greyhounds,
test for tick borne and heart worm diseases and
the effects of exercise (racing) on blood work.

“Through this joint effort, we are trying to learn more about these greyhounds and what makes them tick,” Dr. Bohenko said. “This is the first time a study of this magnitude using actively racing dogs has ever been conducted. Mostly retired greyhounds have been used in the past.”

The greyhounds in the study had blood drawn on three occasions – the day before they were scheduled to race, immediately after their race and one to two hours after the completion of their race.

In addition to tests for heart worm and tick borne diseases, Dr. Couto and his staff did complete blood counts (CBCs), serum chemistry profiles (liver, kidney function, etc.) and blood gas analysis (BGs). The heart worm and tick borne disease tests all were negative.

“It’s a good reflection on the care these greyhounds receive,” Dr. Bohenko said. “It also points out to people who want to adopt them that there are no problems.”

The above article is an excerpt from The National Greyhound Association’s websiteIf you are interested in reading Stan Pawloski’s entire article on the Greyhound Program Click Here.

The Ohio State Greyhound Development Fund is constantly looking for additional sources of funding for this project.  If you wish to make a donation, please visit Greyhound Health and Wellness Fund

Or send a check to The Greyhound Health and Wellness Program, 6012 Vernon L. Tharp St., Columbus, OH 43210.

 

 

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